Categories
Uncategorized

Perusing the NYT book blog, Paper Cuts, I ran across a blurb regarding a review of Wendy Shalit’s “Girls Gone Mild: Young Women Reclaim Self-Respect and Find it’s not Bad to Be Good“. In this synopsis of the review (I couldn’t find a link to the actual review), she quotes the daughter of Erica Jong, Molly, as saying she “admits she was promiscuous in her day, and regrets it; she believes she was sold “a bad bill of goods.”

While I’ve obviously not read Ms. Shalit’s manifesto, I’m always concerned when books of this type are published.

Why are distinctions like “good” and “bad” applied to women’s sexual behavior but never men’s?

Why is there never a title that equates self-respect with the control or limiting of men’s sexuality?

I hit amazon.com to provide a link to Ms. Shalit’s book, and discovered her other publications:

A Return to Modesty: Discovering the Lost Virtue
Articles from “First Thing: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Modern Life” A book review of “Chosen by God: A brother’s Journey”

Am I to infer then that Ms. Shalit has assimilated the worst kind of lie, which is that God, the Almighty, Yaweh, etc. is only concerned with women’s bodies and women’s sexuality? That boys and men are free to roam at will but women are responsible for keeping their urges in check? That it is women who are the gatekeepers of humanity’s morals?

Because quite frankly, if men are capable of running corporations and countries, they should have no problem managing their own penises.

And btw, the cover art is a young woman holding an apple…

Then in a twisted turn of events, I googled the writer of the glowing review, Elizabeth Nickson, and quickly discovered what? An article penned by her for the Christianity.ca site in praise of “intelligent design“. But even better? She was fired from the Canada Post for plagerism in 2004.

Not surprising, she’s still working, still getting paid to pointificate. There are mountains of talented writers who would never espouse their religion as science or remotely consider committing a breach of professional ethics, yet they can’t get so much as a “fuck you” from an editor.

No wonder traditional journalism views the blogosphere as such a threat. At least there I know what I’m getting.

Add Your Thoughts