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Changes in ACOT Charter – good for living donors?

The Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation (ACOT) was established in 2000 under HRSA to advise the Secretary of Health on issues related to transplantation. The original charter describes the function of ACOT as follows:

The Committee shall advise the Secretary, acting through the Administrator, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), on all aspects of organ donation, procurement, allocation, and transplantation, and on such other matters that the Secretary determines. One of its principal functions shall be to advise the Secretary on ways to maximize Federal efforts to increase living and deceased organ donation nationally.

The Committee shall, at the request of the Secretary, review significant proposed OPTN policies submitted for the Secretary’s approval to recommend whether they should be made enforceable. It shall provide expert input to the Secretary on the latest advances in the science of transplantation, the OPTN’s system of collecting, disseminating and ensuring the validity, accuracy, timeliness and usefulness of data, and additional medical, public health, ethical, legal, financial coverage, social science, and socioeconomic issues that are relevant to transplantation.

A new version of the ACOT charter was posted on September, 2010 on organdonor.gov. The phrase regarding the increase of living donation was removed, and in the second paragraph, the words ‘public safety’ were added:

The Committee shall advise the Secretary, acting through the Administrator, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), on all aspects of organ donation, procurement, allocation, and transplantation, and on such other matters that the Secretary determines. One of its principal functions shall be to advise the Secretary on Federal efforts to maximize the number of deceased donor organs made available for transplantation and to support the safety of living organ donation.

The Committee shall, at the request of the Secretary, review significant proposed OPTN policies submitted for the Secretary’s approval to recommend whether they should be made enforceable. It shall provide expert input to the Secretary on the latest advances in the science of transplantation, the OPTN’s system of collecting, disseminating and ensuring the validity, accuracy, timeliness and usefulness of data, and additional medical, public health, patient safety, ethical, legal, financial coverage, social science, and socioeconomic issues that are relevant to transplantation.

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